Lessons Learned From Unemployment Pt. 2

I am so glad to share this list with you. Reading through it, I can plainly see that we have learned a lot! (So much in fact, I could do a fireside on it! J) Most of all, the greatest thing to know, is that we will be trading goods and services. I know this because I have been doing A LOT of this. Have you always been a consumer, or do you have something to give back in form of services? I for one really want to learn how to cut hair, and to do it well. (I have done some serious damage on my poor families heads!)

Questions to ask yourself:

  1. You will loose weight when your diet changes. What will you wear when your clothes are too big?
  2. Do you have clothes and shoes for your growing kids to grow into?
  3. Do you have sufficient warm clothing, boots, hats, gloves etc. for your family? (Including to grow into- I recommend having one of every size to be safe, then you can also share if needs be.)
  4. What are you going to blow your nose into? Consider old-fashioned hankies.
  5. Do you have sufficient toiletries for 2 years including TP, and diapers and wipes, ointments etc. if necessary?
  6. What about deodorant, toothpaste and brushes and floss?
  7. Do you have seeds for the next two years of gardens?
  8. Do you know how to harvest your own seeds?
  9. Do you have something/remedies for bug control? If there are plagues, there will also be pestilence- Yikes! Frogs, Mormon crickets, bugs, rats etc.
  10. Do you know how to garden, and can you actually grow something worth eating?
  11. Will your family eat what you grow and  can you prepare it so that your family will eat it? (Sometimes, my kids ate dog food instead of the dinner I prepared- really.)
  12. Do you have the seasonings and spices to make your food taste good? Buy in bulk whatever you use regularly today.
  13. Can you sustain your lives on what you grow, and for how long? All winter?
  14. What vegetables can we store for the winter that will last? I have really missed carrots and chewing them. Consider pressure canning a vegetable stock. You can use it in a soup, or the veggies in a stir fry, and use the broth to make rice. Squashes from the garden (butternut, banana etc.) will last about 6 months. Potatoes will last until they are all gone if stored in a cool dark place. (20#’s of planted potatoes should last a family of 4, for a 1-year supply.)
  15. Do I have enough canning supplies for 2 years? (Lids, jars, pectin, sugar etc.)
  16. What will you do when you get sick?
  17. Do you have a supply of non and prescription medicines that your family needs?
  18. Do you have herbs and alternative medicines that you can use, and do you know how to use them? If not, take some classes while you can.)
  19. There is no such thing as fast food when you are living on your food storage. What meals can be considered as fast food in your storage? (Our fast foods are the soups, spaghetti sauces etc. and things that I have canned during the summer that just need to be heated up.) Consider pressure canning 7 quarts of beans at a time instead of 1 batch of beans when you cook for dinner. This will save on fuel and time.
  20. What about eye glasses and contacts, and contact solution? Any spares on hand?
  21. Do you have solutions for dysentery and gas? You might be eating a lot of beans.
  22. When there is a quarantine, are you ready and prepared for that? Do you have any education therein?
  23. If you have animals, do you also have a 2-year supply of feed/food, straw and water barrels for them too?
  24. Other than a conventional oven, how can I effectively bake/cook my food/bread? (Dutch ovens w/ coals, solar, slow cooker, beanbag oven, apple box etc.)
  25. If that secondary device breaks, what can I use next. (You should have 2 or more ways to do many things, don’t rely on just one device.)
  26. How will you wash and dry your clothes?
  27. Do you have a supply of laundry soap?
  28. How will you dry your clothes it in the winter months?
  29. Can I stay warm without heat? How will I do that? You should have many different sources. Kerosene, propane, gas, etc. If you have a generator, how much gas can you really afford to store and for how long?
  30. What skills/talents/ things do I have that I could barter with if necessary?
  31. Who will cut your families hair?
  32. If you color your hair you might want to store some of that- as long as there is water, you might as well look gorgeous. (Especially because everyone else will be gray, and have to ear a hat! J )
  33. Do I need to start working on a skill/talent to have bartering power?
  34. What other items do I want to get simply to barter with?

Lessons From Unemployment Pt. 3

Obviously, there are many things here too sacred to mention, but here are some things that really helped us.

 Spiritual Things:

  1. When the spirit tells you to purchase something, just do it, and do it quickly so that the spirit can continue to use you as a conduit for your family.
  2. It doesn’t matter how much food storage you have, if you are not spiritually strong and prepared to follow the Lord, you will fall apart.
  3. Surrender to the Lords will for you and your family. Hit your knees to the pavement ASAP and ask for instructions.
  4. Be humble. Don’t be afraid to ask and then receive help from others. When you get help, receive it with gratitude and humility.
  5. Talk- confide in your visiting teachers, home teachers and if necessary the bishop. Their job is to support us, and to listen and help if they can. We shouldn’t deny them or anyone else the opportunity to help/bless our families. They are a great support system and they have ways that we might not know of that can help us.
  6. Obedience, Obedience, Obedience!
    • There are huge blessings in store for us when we stay out of debt.
    • There are huge blessings in having food storage, and having had eaten it all along the way- less diarrhea and over all shock to the system.
    • When we follow the prophet and plant a garden, the Lord will bless our crops and bless us.
  7. When we stay home and don’t spend money, we can unify as a family and must be more creative in our entertainment. Make a game out of it and it becomes fun and an exciting opportunity instead of a challenge/trial.
  8. The most important things in life are our family and our relationships with them. (Even more important than a house) Loose your house before you loose a family member.
  9. When we put our faith 100% in the Lord, miracles happen and are easily recognizable- every day.
  10. When miracles are expected to happen every day, they do. “The Lord will bless us according to our faith in Him”.
  11. Pray for the little things that would make you happy. It’s by little things that great things come to pass. The Lord wants to see us happy and he can prove time and time again that he is there, and cares for you by those little things that only matter to us personally, and no one else.
  12. Pride prevents miracles, unity, and blessings from coming.
  13. Our greatest trials are usually our greatest blessings. Count your blessings and daily miracles and keep a journal of them. It is amazing to look back on those list to see how blessed you have really been.
  14. Money can come from unbelievable places when you really need it- even strangers. The Lord can whisper into people ears that you don’t even know to help you, and they will.
  15. Going to the temple is a necessity- as often as possible. When you have people on both sides of the veil pulling for you, you can accomplish more, and have more strength.
  16. Read your scriptures daily! Make new daily habits if necessary. That is where the Lord speaks to you, in His language.
  17. Always keep a sincere prayer in your heart and pray on your knees as often as you need/want. Pray while driving, while sleeping and any other time. Keep a prayer in your heart.
  18. Pay your tithing first- no matter how small the amount.
  19. Before paying your bills, pray, thanking Heavenly Father for having enough money to pay them. It will surprise you how far your money can go.
  20. When you rely solely upon the Lord, he will bless you if you tell him what your needs are. If you want chocolate, some how, it ends up on your porch! He finds ways to let you know that you are not forgotten. (It is a very sweet experience.)

 

 

 

 

Pandemic Shopping List

N95 particulate face masks- 4 boxes (2 boxes per adult)

Latex gloves- 200 pairs in a variety of sizes

Anti bacterial hand sanitizer Lg. bottle

Digital thermometer

Alcohol

Hydrogen peroxide

Bell/whistle

Anti-bacterial wipes

5 hospital gowns

5 hospital caps

5 pairs of hospital shoe covers

Things to prepare to be ready for a pandemic:

1.   Prescription drugs to insure a continuous supply in your home. You may ask your doctor if he has samples or can help you to lawfully prepare.

2.   First aid supplies.

3.   Nonprescription drugs including pain and fever relievers, stomach remedies, anti diarrhea medications, and cough and cold medicines and preventive medications.

4.   Remember, never give young children aspirin. Purchase medications specifically designed for children.

5.   Fluids with electrolytes.

6.   Vitamins.

7.   Anti bacterial wipes for cleaning up after attending to a patient.

8.   Hand sanitizers should also be included in your first aid supplies. These should be used every time you are with someone who is ill or after you shake hands with anyone.

9.   Make sure you also have at least one thermometer on hand and alcohol to clean it.

Medical gloves are essential. Purchase a variety of sizes for the needs of all family members. Remember, some gloves are latex – so if you think you may have a latex allergy use care in selecting gloves.

10.  N95 particulate face masks. These will help prevent the transfer of germs as you are in public or caring for a loved one. There are many types of medical masks. The surgical variety will provide added protection from fluids. These are especially valuable when you are caring for someone who is sweating, sneezing or vomiting. For the best protection these need to fit firmly against the face. If you are using masks for children place the mask on the face and then a bandana. This will help to hold the mask firmly on their face. It can be like dress up! Make sure you remove the bandana and place it directly into the washer. Then discard the mask, preferably outside, and wash your child’s hands, face and exposed skin thoroughly with a hand sanitizer. I have heard people advise that masks do not need to be stored because they cannot be fitted tightly enough to the face. So long as hospitals, police and fire departments and schools are stocking up with supplies of masks for all their staff and students, I am stocking face masks, too. When they no longer consider it important, I will stop. Until then, I believe it is important.

11. Paper plates, cup, bowls, and utensils will cut down on the possibility that germs will be passed as meals are cleared. They will also save precious time for those who are the care givers and a must have should the power fail.

12. Paper towels, become essential items for keeping your home germ free.

13. Stock up on TP and facial tissues with anti bacterial properties…you will use more than you think during a time of illness. Each family will need a different amount of these items. Don’t guess what your need will be. For at least one month keep track of how may rolls of toilet paper and how many boxes of tissues you use. I suggest you place the wrapper from the TP roll in a drawer and at the end of the month count how many you have used. You can multiply this number by three to understand how much you need to store. Add an additional 25%-50% more to prepare for a pandemic as family members will all be home all day long, and some family members are likely to be ill.

14. Large plastic trash bags for soiled clothing,towels, and trash.

15. Liquid soaps: laundry and dish soaps will be much more useful if there is an interruption in your utility service.

16. Bleach for laundry and cleaning, and other disinfectant cleaning supplies should also be stored.

17. Remember the foods we discussed in Preparing for a Flu Pandemic with Food Storage.

18. Alternative to electricity.

a. For light: Flashlights, glow sticks, and/or lanterns, and batteries.

b. For heat: Firewood, non-electric heaters (propane or kerosene – follow manufacturer instructions for safety), and heavy blankets and/or sleeping bags.

c. For Cooking: Portable propane cook stove, barbecue grill and fuel, can opener.

d. For Laundry: large tub for washing laundry, rope for a clothes line and clothes pins.

e. For Communications: Battery/solar/crank radio and/or TV to keep up on the news and health warnings.

f. Water: Bleach and other items needed for purification.

19. Sanitation needs: Port-a-potty with chemicals and liner, kitty litter or sand to help absorb waste and a plan to bury your waste away from your home. You will also need to be prepared to bury or otherwise dispose of every day’s trash in case services are suspended temporarily.

20. Entertainment: Just think about three months at home with no place to go. Talk about cabin fever! Consider purchasing DVDs that you know your children or spouse would like to have. Keep them put away until they are needed or until the next major gift giving occasion. Then replace the old with new titles. You can also establish a stash of age appropriate books, magazines, puzzles and games. Reading a few classic books as a family would also be a great way to pass the time. Stock up on craft supplies and even a new hobby to start with the kids. Cooking can be lots of fun together so make sure your three month supply includes ingredients to make some fun snacks and meals. A sense of humor is key to survival, so be sure to choose entertainment that is funny and/or uplifting.

21. Cash: Should the power fail ATM machines and credit cards will not work. Have a stash of small denomination bills on hand for emergencies when you are forced to leave your home.

22. Gas up: As soon as you hear the flu has come to your region, fill all your cars with gas. Not only will supplies be hard to come by, but if the power fails, so do the pumps.

23. Develop a list of health care providers in your area including clinics and hospitals. Include friends in health care, who you can call at home to get advice or direction.

24. A bell or whistle for your patient to sound when they are in need of help. A whistle can be heard much easier than the human voice.

25. Whether you are trying to prevent disease or prevent it from spreading, you will want to take precautions in every aspect of your family routine. Now is the time to start by teaching and practicing good habits.

26. Teach your family the proper way to wash their hands. You do not need to use hand sanitizers on a daily basis. In fact, this can prove dangerous as sanitizers kill all germs, good and bad. Hands should be washed with plenty of water, soap and scrubbing. Practice rubbing all the surfaces of the hands, including the fingernails and between fingers, under running water every time you wash. Since this needs to take some time children can learn to be patient and sing either Happy Birthday or the ABC Song while scrubbing. This will help them to recognize the length of time necessary to do a thorough washing.

Some of this list is taken from Meridian Magazine and other classes I have attended.