Pandemic 10 Week Challenge

Please don’t put this important stuff off for later. Do it now!

 

Week #1

2 buckets

1 box of contractor type garbage bags (To make your own porta-potty in case you lose utilities)

Kitty litter – 1 bag per/person.  This can be used for absorbing all bodily fluids.

Extra garbage bags for soiled/contaminated clothing, towels or regular garbage disposal

Pet food/prescriptions, water – don’t forget them!

 

Week #2

Oral Re-Hydration formula

Buy it or make your own:

  • 1⁄4 teas salt
  • 1⁄4 teas Lite salt
  • 1⁄4 teas baking soda
  • 2 1⁄2 teas sugar
  • Combine these ingredients w/ 1 liter of sterile water.  Suggest making up several of these

and save it in small baggies.  Store in your kit.  Taste before relying on this recipe – make

it palatable for your family.

Thermometer and alcohol to clean it

Prescriptions, pain/fever reducers, vitamins

First Aid kit – make sure hand sanitizer is included

 

Week #3

Water – determine drinking and to mix with bleach and other detergents to clean with

1 gallon of liquid bleach and disinfectant cleaners

Liquid cleaners (soap, dish soap) – if utilities go out these will be easier than powdered cleaners

2 boxes of N95 masks for each adult in the household – make sure it fits firmly against the face. 

As long as hospitals keep these in stock, you should too.

 

Week #4

Latex gloves

Anti-bacterial gloves (some people are allergic to latex)

Several boxes of borax

Anti-bacterial wipes for cleaning up after a patient

A bell or whistle for the patient to get our attention

List of Health Care Providers in your area, including clinics and hospitals who you can call at

home to get advice or directions if needed

 

Week #5

Toilet paper (suggest 100 rolls per/person) you will use more than normal when people are sick

Paper towels (suggest 20 rolls per/person)

 

Week #6

Shampoo, conditioner, soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, feminine hygiene products,

lotion, etc. (The things you don’t want to really run out of.  Suggest 3 months supply of each of

these.)

 

Week #7

A 100 ft. roll of clear 4 mil plastic (avail at Lowes or Home Depot)

10 rolls of duct tape

These items can be used to temporarily replace windows in the case of an earthquake, or also

seal off a room from the pandemic.)

 

Week #8

Paper plates, cups, plastic cutlery, will cut down on the possibility of spreading germs and save

you time to get back to care-giving.

Cash – should the power fail, ATM machines and credit cards will not work.  Have a stash of

small denomination bills on hand for emergencies when you are forced to leave your home.

 

Week #9

Alternative to Electricity Items:

For light – flashlights, glow sticks, lanterns, emergency candles, batteries

For heat – firewood, non-electric heaters (propane or kerosene – follow the manufacturer’s

instructions for safety very carefully.  We don’t want to burn the house down.)

For cooking – portable propane cook stove, barbeque grill, fuel, and non-electric can opener

For laundry – large tub, rope for a clothesline or a clothesline, and clothespins

For communications – battery/solar/crank radio and/or TV to keep up with the news or health

warnings

 

Week #10

Entertainment.  Just think about three months at home with no place to go. Talk about cabin

fever! Consider purchasing DVDs that you know your children or spouse would like to have. Keep

them put away until they are needed or until the next major gift giving occasion. Then replace the

old with new titles. You can also establish a stash of age appropriate books, magazines, puzzles

and games. Reading a few classic books as a family would also be a great way to pass the time.

Stock up on craft supplies and even a new hobby to start with the kids. Cooking can be lots of fun

together so make sure your three month supply includes ingredients to make some fun snacks

and meals. A sense of humor is key to survival, so be sure to choose entertainment that is funny

and/or uplifting. 

 

And finally….

Gas up.  As soon as you hear the flu has come to your region, fill all your cars with gas.  Not only

1.   will supplies be hard to come by, but if the power fails, so do the pumps.

2.   Cash: Should the power fail ATM machines and credit cards will not work. Have a stash of small denomination bills on hand for emergencies when you are forced to leave your home.

From Wendy Dewitt

A Voice of Warning

Last summer, I attended a Pandemic preparedness regional meeting offered by a Medical Doctor who was called by our church, on a mission to teach us about pandemics and how to prepare for them. Her exact wording was “when” there is a pandemic, not “if” there is a pandemic. She talked about how the Lord has always used plagues, pestilence and sickness to help his children turn their hearts to Him. She also stated (the MD) that we are well over due for a pandemic. When I first heard this information, I thought that most of you sisters would totally freak out- basically, so I have been hesitant to pass on the ino.

Since Christmas, as I have been studying and praying about what classes to teach, I have had strong feelings and noticed a similar thread among reputable websites I have checked. They are all talking about and encouraging us to prepare for the pandemic- including LDS.org. (http://providentliv ing.org/content/ display/0, 11666,8041- 1-4414-1, 00.html
) In my patriarchal blessing, it specifically states that I will be “preserved during times of pestilence and plagues”. This is yet another reason that I feel strongly about becoming prepared for it, because the Lord specifically told me that they would come. I suppose that we can all put our heads in the sand, or become educated, and prepare so as to have “no fear” as our prophets promise us. I hope that you will join me in the classes that will come. It would be awful to loose family members, or even ourselves, when perhaps we could have prepared and perhaps prevented some calamity through education.

 

When I read the 1st Presidency’s message in the Ensign this month, (Januray 2009, Be a voice of warning) my feelings were reinforced and I am prompted to pass a long the information I have gathered. Please, if you don’t feel like it is your time to prepare, save the information, until you are ready, or pass it along to someone you love. When we become educated as a ward, family and friends, there is strength in numbers and support beyond measure. I know we all feel this way.

 

Here is the information from the pandemic seminar; the class schedule of classes that I will teach will come later.

Pandemic Preparedness fireside notes

Dear Friends,

I attended the recent fireside by Dr. Susan Puls who serves as the Medical Coordinator for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Emergency Response program.  If you are interested you can read my summary of the key points of her address.

1.  The scriptures tell/command us not to fear at least 91 times.    We can live comfortably if we choose a culture of preparedness and readiness.

2.  Every family should prepare a one page preparedness document that lists where everyone is likely to be, phone numbers, doctors, out-of-state contacts, meeting places etc.  This should be reviewed often with the family.   (I have also heard a good idea presented elsewhere suggesting an “essentials” list, in priority order, posted on commonly used exit doors identifying what to grab on the way out during an evacuation.)

3.  Everyone should have a 72 hr. kit or a “grab and go” bag.  It should have water, life-saving medication (i.e. insulin for a diabetic etc.) food, shelter, etc.  In an emergency the only way you can maybe get necessary supplies you are lacking is if you have CASH.  (In my opinion we should have cash in our wallets, in our homes, in our cars, & in our 72 hour kits.)  One of the biggest problems faced by victims of disaster is BOREDOM!  Be sure to include something to keep you and your children occupied in your 72 hr. kit.   

4.  We should have longer term supplies in our homes…such as: medical kit, prescription glasses, baby formula (even if you normally breastfeed), radio, lights, tools, shelter, blankets, tents, clothes, children and pet supplies, toys, treats, etc.

5.  Have 3 months supply of food your family normally eats, 9 months of bulk food stores, 2 weeks of water and equipment for and knowledge of how to clean water, and financial reserves.  Rotate and use your supplies.

6.  When the PANDEMIC(S) happen it (they) will be (a) worldwide event(s).  (No one from a neighboring state or country is going to come in and provide you with assistance.  You must be ready to take care of yourself and your family.)   “If you expect your neighbors to feed you, hopefully you like tortillas!  That will be all that they can slide under your door!”   In “mock” pandemic drills, persons driving I-15 Southbound through Utah were barred from exiting the freeway!

7.  The Avian Flu (JUST one of many possible pandemic candidates) is in 67 countries.  Out of 383 cases 241 fatalities have occurred.  Human to human transmission of the disease has occurred in 15 countries.  We are in “Phase 3” (human to human transmission occurs but not easily.  “Phase 6” is pandemic where human to human transmission is easy and RAPID!)  In pandemics at least 40% of the work force will be home sick or protecting themselves from getting sick.  Schools, churches, movie theatres, etc. will all close.  Pandemics are expected to last for 3-6 months and will come in 2 to 3 waves lasting about 6 weeks.  50% of deaths occur in people 19 and under, 70% in those 29 and under, and 90% in those 39 and under.  (Looks like it could be a good thing to be over 40!)

8.   HAND WASHING is the single most important and effective component for preventing the transmission of infection.  Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for AT LEAST 20 seconds whether you are sick or healthy.  We should learn to keep our hands away from our eyes, nose, and mouth.  Go to www.coughsafe.com to watch a video about proper coughing and sneezing etiquette.  (This would be a good FHE activity.  The video lasts about 5 minutes and is funny as well as informative.)  We should disinfect common surfaces such as telephones, door knobs, toilet handles, computer key boards, refrigerator handles etc. often with regular household cleaning products containing bleach.  Be sure to store plenty of cleaners.  If you haven’t seen it before watch the pandemic video put out by BYU-I at http://streaming.byui.edu/safetyoffice/flu.wmv

9. Review all the pandemic information on the church website http://providentliving.org/content/display/0,11666,8041-1-4414-1,00.html Consider getting a supply of N95 Respirator Surgical Masks (she said at least 20/person), gloves, sanitation gowns, foot coverings and eye goggles..  (The best price I could find on the internet for the masks today was at Emergency Essentials -14.95/box of 20.  I think the best price on gloves is at Sam’s or Costco.  I bought the other stuff at www.onlinemedicalsupply.com )

 

If you are interested in more information from the seminar I attended, you can log onto http://webpub.byu.net/dst05/  to get the notes prepared by those who ran it.

The above notes are taken from  the Spanish Fork South Stake Self Reliance Fair held  Saturday August 23, 2008.

Pandemic Shopping List

N95 particulate face masks- 4 boxes (2 boxes per adult)

Latex gloves- 200 pairs in a variety of sizes

Anti bacterial hand sanitizer Lg. bottle

Digital thermometer

Alcohol

Hydrogen peroxide

Bell/whistle

Anti-bacterial wipes

5 hospital gowns

5 hospital caps

5 pairs of hospital shoe covers

Things to prepare to be ready for a pandemic:

1.   Prescription drugs to insure a continuous supply in your home. You may ask your doctor if he has samples or can help you to lawfully prepare.

2.   First aid supplies.

3.   Nonprescription drugs including pain and fever relievers, stomach remedies, anti diarrhea medications, and cough and cold medicines and preventive medications.

4.   Remember, never give young children aspirin. Purchase medications specifically designed for children.

5.   Fluids with electrolytes.

6.   Vitamins.

7.   Anti bacterial wipes for cleaning up after attending to a patient.

8.   Hand sanitizers should also be included in your first aid supplies. These should be used every time you are with someone who is ill or after you shake hands with anyone.

9.   Make sure you also have at least one thermometer on hand and alcohol to clean it.

Medical gloves are essential. Purchase a variety of sizes for the needs of all family members. Remember, some gloves are latex – so if you think you may have a latex allergy use care in selecting gloves.

10.  N95 particulate face masks. These will help prevent the transfer of germs as you are in public or caring for a loved one. There are many types of medical masks. The surgical variety will provide added protection from fluids. These are especially valuable when you are caring for someone who is sweating, sneezing or vomiting. For the best protection these need to fit firmly against the face. If you are using masks for children place the mask on the face and then a bandana. This will help to hold the mask firmly on their face. It can be like dress up! Make sure you remove the bandana and place it directly into the washer. Then discard the mask, preferably outside, and wash your child’s hands, face and exposed skin thoroughly with a hand sanitizer. I have heard people advise that masks do not need to be stored because they cannot be fitted tightly enough to the face. So long as hospitals, police and fire departments and schools are stocking up with supplies of masks for all their staff and students, I am stocking face masks, too. When they no longer consider it important, I will stop. Until then, I believe it is important.

11. Paper plates, cup, bowls, and utensils will cut down on the possibility that germs will be passed as meals are cleared. They will also save precious time for those who are the care givers and a must have should the power fail.

12. Paper towels, become essential items for keeping your home germ free.

13. Stock up on TP and facial tissues with anti bacterial properties…you will use more than you think during a time of illness. Each family will need a different amount of these items. Don’t guess what your need will be. For at least one month keep track of how may rolls of toilet paper and how many boxes of tissues you use. I suggest you place the wrapper from the TP roll in a drawer and at the end of the month count how many you have used. You can multiply this number by three to understand how much you need to store. Add an additional 25%-50% more to prepare for a pandemic as family members will all be home all day long, and some family members are likely to be ill.

14. Large plastic trash bags for soiled clothing,towels, and trash.

15. Liquid soaps: laundry and dish soaps will be much more useful if there is an interruption in your utility service.

16. Bleach for laundry and cleaning, and other disinfectant cleaning supplies should also be stored.

17. Remember the foods we discussed in Preparing for a Flu Pandemic with Food Storage.

18. Alternative to electricity.

a. For light: Flashlights, glow sticks, and/or lanterns, and batteries.

b. For heat: Firewood, non-electric heaters (propane or kerosene – follow manufacturer instructions for safety), and heavy blankets and/or sleeping bags.

c. For Cooking: Portable propane cook stove, barbecue grill and fuel, can opener.

d. For Laundry: large tub for washing laundry, rope for a clothes line and clothes pins.

e. For Communications: Battery/solar/crank radio and/or TV to keep up on the news and health warnings.

f. Water: Bleach and other items needed for purification.

19. Sanitation needs: Port-a-potty with chemicals and liner, kitty litter or sand to help absorb waste and a plan to bury your waste away from your home. You will also need to be prepared to bury or otherwise dispose of every day’s trash in case services are suspended temporarily.

20. Entertainment: Just think about three months at home with no place to go. Talk about cabin fever! Consider purchasing DVDs that you know your children or spouse would like to have. Keep them put away until they are needed or until the next major gift giving occasion. Then replace the old with new titles. You can also establish a stash of age appropriate books, magazines, puzzles and games. Reading a few classic books as a family would also be a great way to pass the time. Stock up on craft supplies and even a new hobby to start with the kids. Cooking can be lots of fun together so make sure your three month supply includes ingredients to make some fun snacks and meals. A sense of humor is key to survival, so be sure to choose entertainment that is funny and/or uplifting.

21. Cash: Should the power fail ATM machines and credit cards will not work. Have a stash of small denomination bills on hand for emergencies when you are forced to leave your home.

22. Gas up: As soon as you hear the flu has come to your region, fill all your cars with gas. Not only will supplies be hard to come by, but if the power fails, so do the pumps.

23. Develop a list of health care providers in your area including clinics and hospitals. Include friends in health care, who you can call at home to get advice or direction.

24. A bell or whistle for your patient to sound when they are in need of help. A whistle can be heard much easier than the human voice.

25. Whether you are trying to prevent disease or prevent it from spreading, you will want to take precautions in every aspect of your family routine. Now is the time to start by teaching and practicing good habits.

26. Teach your family the proper way to wash their hands. You do not need to use hand sanitizers on a daily basis. In fact, this can prove dangerous as sanitizers kill all germs, good and bad. Hands should be washed with plenty of water, soap and scrubbing. Practice rubbing all the surfaces of the hands, including the fingernails and between fingers, under running water every time you wash. Since this needs to take some time children can learn to be patient and sing either Happy Birthday or the ABC Song while scrubbing. This will help them to recognize the length of time necessary to do a thorough washing.

Some of this list is taken from Meridian Magazine and other classes I have attended.