Neem Bulk Order

 

Hi ladies,

Just a reminder about our sprouting class this Thursday at 10:00am April’s House.We will be learning all of the ins-and-outs of sprouting including dirt sprouting. If you have any recipes or testers of your own to bring and share, please do, I welcome any and all good information that each of you has to offer. The sharing that we do is what makes these classes so much fun. We will also do some group buys for sprouts, and sprouters.

 

For those who are interested in Neem or Karanja oil and cake, the bulk prices are listed below. The applications for both of these organic products are endless. If you haven’t already, check out at www.neemresource.com to read all about it. It is amazing stuff that is well worth the price and lasts a very, very long time. It is good for bug/spider control, fertilizer etc. We use about 1 -2 oz. for our entire orchard and yard last year as well as this year. Shipping will be added later.

 

The following prices are based on the hope that we can get a minimum of 12 bottles. Otherwise, we only get a 10% discount.

 

Neem Oil 8 oz.               reg. $12.00             bulk price  $9.00

                32 oz.                reg. $36.00             bulk price $28.00

                1 gallon            reg. $75.00             bulk price $65.00


Karanja Oil 8 oz.            reg. $11.00             bulk price  $8.00

                  32 oz.               reg. $33.00             bulk price $26.50

                  1 gallon            reg. $68.00             bulk price $58.00

The Karanja cake and Neem cake is what you can use as fertilizer in your garden. It aerates,  nourishes, slowly releases nitrogen, promotes plant growth and resistance improves soil quality and is 100% organic!

 

The following prices are based on the hope that we can get a minimum of 10. Otherwise, the price is the same as on line- $38.00 and $29.00 for the Karanja.

 

Neem Cake            44 #’s  $33.00            (1 # covers 100 to 160 sq. feet)

Karanja Cake       44 #’s  $24.00.           (1 # covers 100 to 160 sq. feet)

 

Obviously, depending on your garden size, this could be a 2 or more year supply and is well worth the money! 

 

Thanks y’all           

April 🙂

Organic Gardening Resources

 

The following sites are recommendations from Rebekah Grifins class. Thanks Rebekah! 🙂


How to build your own rain barrel

             http://www.bayteccontainers.com/plastic-rain-barrel-faq.html

            http://www.cityofbremerton.com/content/forms/MakeYourOwnRainBarrel.pdf

 

Build a compost pile

            http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/rrr/composting/by_compost.htm

 

Build a compost tumbler

            http://www.howtohomestead.org/?page_id=266

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcPz4XF-yUM&NR=1

            http://www.thefrugallifenews.com/2008/09/make-your-own-compost-tumbler.html

 

 

Books

 

Organic Gardening by Geoff Hamilton

 

Seed to Seed by Suzanne Ashworth

 

Animal, Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver

Save Money by Making Your Own “Peat Pots”

When I heard about this I was all over it. Can you imagine if we saved all of our toilet paper rolls throughout the year how many little pots we’d have come spring? We could really plant early and get a jump on the growing season! Not only is this a great idea, but it’s plantet friendly and saves a lot of money in many ways. 

Millions of toilet paper rolls end up in landfills every day. If you garden, you’re tossing away money. Recycling cardboard toilet paper rolls into homemade peat pots for your garden is easy and economical.

You will need a plastic plant tray, or another shallow, flat container. Big box store garden centers will let you have trays for free. Look under the benches, or consolidate plants in another tray and ask for the empty ones.

Toilet paper rolls make great homemade peat pots for seedlings or small cuttings for the garden.

  • First, cut your toilet paper rolls in half.
  • Then cut one end in four places, and fold the flaps inward to make a bottom. Cutting them in four places makes a square bottom, so you can fit more into a tray. 
  • You can put a small piece of masking tape on the bottom, but it isn’t necessary, because as soon as they are wet, they will stand up. (I would use paper tape if I needed to.)
  • Place the toilet paper rolls into the tray and add potting mix, then plant your seed or stick your cutting. 
  • You will need to water until your homemade peat pots are wet, so they will not suck water from the soil. If you have one, a larger tray or shallow pan to soak the toilet paper rolls is preferable to overhead watering.

For larger cuttings, and seedlings of plants that need more root space, only cut the toilet paper rolls with four cuts at the bottom. These taller homemade peat pots are great for rooting tomato suckers and woody cuttings for your garden, as they encourage the roots to grow downward instead of outward.

Recycling Other Cardboard Rolls

An alternative to toilet paper rolls is recycling cardboard rolls left over from wrapping paper, aluminum foil, and plastic wraps. These sturdier cardboard rolls can be cut to any size you need. The taller homemade peat pots are actually better for rooting woody cuttings for your garden, because they don’t break down as quickly.

Once your seedlings or cuttings are ready to transplant, you simply place your homemade peat pots into your garden soil or container, and they will break down just like real peat pots, becoming part of the soil.

Another way of recycling cardboard rolls for your garden is to flatten them and cut small pieces to cover holes in the bottom of pots. The water will get through, but the soil will not.

To keep weeds out of your pots, try recycling cardboard rolls by unrolling them and placing them on top of the soil, under a layer of mulch or rocks, much as you would use cardboard boxes in your garden.

If none of these tips for recycling cardboard rolls in your garden interests you, simply cut them up and put them into your compost pile. Whatever you do with them, don’t just toss them out!

I’m sure that you can find a myriad of other ways of recycling toilet paper and other cardboard rolls. Using your imagination for recycling common everyday items that were once thrown away can go a long way toward saving our planet.

Idea comes from brighthub.com.

Group Buy on Seeds

Hi everyone,

Rebecca taught an amazing class yesterday on gardening, passed out catalogs and we are offering a bulk sale on garden seeds. There are some fantastic varieties at great prices. Have fun choosing which ones to buy. I want five of each!

Have a great day, April  🙂

P.S. Thanks Rebekah for a great class with a ton of important information. You inspired me completely. I am going to grow a row of sunflowers, so that I can try all the groovy stuff you talked about in your class. (Wouldn’t Mary Englebrite be so proud!) In the fall, I will post what I am talking about, on a later post about Sunflowers.

 

 

Hi everyone! I am trying to get the seed order finalized. If you didn’t get a chance to order at the class today, or if you didn’t make it to the class, here is some more info for you. I think a lot of people didn’t really understand what we are ordering- These are non hybrid seeds that you can store in your food storage or plant in your garden. You will be getting a lot of seeds- the amount will vary depending on how many people order, but in general it will be 5-10x the amount you would get in a packet from the store. There will be plenty to plant and to store.

 

The more people that order, the cheaper they will be. For example, the seeds that are most expensive right now is the corn- mostly because not many people ordered it. But the people who are getting it will get a lot of seeds. So if more people order, the price will drop, as will the number of seeds you get.

 

Here is a list of the current prices and how many seeds (approx.) you get for that price. As more people order the price will fluctuate, but it will only get better!

 

Please try to get me your order in by the end of Friday, and then we can get payments figured out and get these ordered next week. (So we can start planting!) Please send your order to Rebekah Griffin at milkmaid35@gmail.com. We didn’t have enough demand for compost tumblers and rain barrels, but if you would like to order some pots, we could use more orders to get better prices. These are biodegradable pots for starting plants and can be directly planted into your garden to eliminate transplant shock.

 

  • 2″ pots $7 for 100
  • 3″pots $12 for 100
  • 4″ pots $12 for 50

 

OK, here are the seed prices.

  • Green Beans, bush .60/100 seeds
  • Green beans, pole 2.55/100 seeds
  • Dry Beans, white 1.50/80 seeds
  • Beets 2.50/120 seeds
  • Broccoli .93/500 seeds
  • Canteloupe 1.05/95 seeds
  • Carrots 1.00/1000 seeds
  • Corn, sweet 2.00/150 seeds
  • Corn, dry/field 2.53/220 seeds
  • Cucumber .68/355 seeds
  • Kale 1.38/100 seeds
  • Leeks 3.00/500 seeds
  • Lettuce 1.00/600 seeds
  • Onions 1.50/500 seeds
  • Peas .65/165 seeds
  • Green Peppers 1.00/77 seeds
  • Pie Pumpkins .75/25 seeds
  • Carving Pumpkins .75/25 seeds
  • Radishes .60/250 seeds
  • Spinach .70/830 seeds
  • Acorn squash .90/32 seeds
  • Butternut squash 1.00/57 seeds
  • Spaghetti squash 1.00/ 62 seeds
  • Zucchini 1.30/70 seeds
  • Yellow squash 1.22/110 seeds
  • Roma Tomatoes 1.23/147 seeds
  • Heirloom slicing tomato 1.58/147 seeds
  • Cherry yellow pear tomato .94/100 seeds
  • Turnips .60/7900 seeds
  • Watermelon 1.40/275 seeds
  • Parsley .85/6600 seeds
  • Basil .40/417 seeds
  • Thyme .75/3375 seeds
  • Mint 1.67/1250 seeds
  • Cilantro .68/1000

 

Thanks! Rebekah

Pumpkin Soup

Here is a very yummy recipe and a great way to use your home-grown pumpkins!  

  • 1 Lg Pumpkin 

Grease pan where pumpkin will sit.

  • Brown 1#  ground beef with onions and celery

In a medium bowl mix together

  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 2 TBS brown sugar
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 can of cream of chicken soup
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • dash of nutmeg
  • 2 cups cooked or instant rice
  • 1 quart tomatoes

Add the ground beef and put in a cleaned out pumpkin.

Put on the lid and bake at 350 degrees for 2 hours.

Recipe via. Penny Dewey

I grew it, now what do I do with it?

I have figured out what to do with all of that zucchini from our garden- Cut into thin slices, put toppings on it like lemon pepper, salt and vinegar, bbq sauce, powdered cheese, powdered ranch etc. dehydrate it, and you have the new healthy potatoe chip! Give it a try. My family loves them!